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14 posts tagged with "github actions"

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· 10 min read
John Reilly

Bicep has had linting since version 0.4.1. It's a great way to ensure that your bicep files conform to best practices. Interestingly, when the linting feature first shipped, there wasn't an explicit lint command as part of the CLI. Instead, you had to run bicep build and it would run the linter as part of the build process. This was a little confusing as it was not obvious that the linter was running.

As of version 0.21.1 there is a dedicated bicep lint command. This is a nice step forwards; it allows you to explicitly lint your your code, rather than have it happen as a side effect of build. And it is useful if you want to run the linter as part of a CI/CD pipeline. What's more the bicep lint command is now available in the Azure CLI as well. You can run az bicep lint to lint your bicep files.

In this post we'll look at how to run lint Bicep in Azure Pipelines and GitHub Actions, and surface the output in the UI.

title image reading "Bicep lint with Azure Pipelines and GitHub Actions" with the Bicep logo

· 12 min read
John Reilly

Lighthouse is a tremendous tool for auditing the performance and usability of websites. Rather than having to perform these audits manually, it's helpful to be able to plug it into your CI pipeline. This post illustrates how to integrate Lighthouse into a GitHub Actions workflow for an Azure Static Web App, and report findings directly in pull requests that are raised.

title image reading "Lighthouse meet GitHub Actions" with the Lighthouse logo and a screenshot of the results in a GitHub comment`

· 22 min read
John Reilly

This post shows how to build and deploy two Azure Container Apps using Bicep and GitHub Actions. These apps will communicate using dapr, be built in VS Code using a devcontainer. It will be possible to debug in VS Code and run with docker-compose.

This follows on from the previous post which built and deployed a simple web application to Azure Container Apps using Bicep and GitHub Actions using the GitHub container registry.

title image reading "Azure Container Apps dapr, devcontainer, debug and deploy"  with the dapr, Bicep, Azure Container Apps and GitHub Actions logos

· 14 min read
John Reilly

This post shows how to build and deploy a simple web application to Azure Container Apps using Bicep and GitHub Actions. This includes the configuration and deployment of secrets.

This post follows on from the previous post which deployed infrastructure and a "hello world" container, this time introducing the building of an image and storing it in the GitHub container registry so it can be deployed.

If you'd like to learn more about using dapr with Azure Container Apps then you might want to read this post.

title image reading "Azure Container Apps: build and deploy with Bicep and GitHub Actions" with the Bicep, Azure Container Apps and GitHub Actions logos

· 4 min read
John Reilly

Azure Container Apps are an exciting way to deploy containers to Azure. This post shows how to deploy the infrastructure for an Azure Container App to Azure using Bicep and GitHub Actions. The Azure Container App documentation features quickstarts for deploying your first container app using both the Azure Portal and the Azure CLI. These are great, but there's a gap if you prefer to deploy using Bicep and you'd like to get your CI/CD setup right from the beginning. This post aims to fill that gap.

If you're interested in building your own containers as well, it's worth looking at this follow up post.

title image reading "Azure Container Apps, Bicep and GitHub Actions" with the Bicep, Azure Container Apps and GitHub Actions logos