Skip to main content

13 posts tagged with "Azure Pipelines"

The Azure Pipelines CI / CD service.

View All Tags

Using Bun in Azure Pipelines

· 2 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

I'm a keen user of Bun. Bun is a fast TypeScript / JavaScript runtime which can be used to speed up the TypeScript / JavaScript you have. It's a drop-in replacement for Node.js, and it's compatible with the vast majority of the Node.js ecosystem. (There are still rough edges that have issues.) In this post we'll look at how to use it in Azure Pipelines.

title image reading "Using Bun in Azure Pipelines" with the Bun and Azure Pipelines logos

Bicep lint with Azure Pipelines and GitHub Actions

· 10 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

Bicep has had linting since version 0.4.1. It's a great way to ensure that your bicep files conform to best practices. Interestingly, when the linting feature first shipped, there wasn't an explicit lint command as part of the CLI. Instead, you had to run bicep build and it would run the linter as part of the build process. This was a little confusing as it was not obvious that the linter was running.

As of version 0.21.1 there is a dedicated bicep lint command. This is a nice step forwards; it allows you to explicitly lint your your code, rather than have it happen as a side effect of build. And it is useful if you want to run the linter as part of a CI/CD pipeline. What's more the bicep lint command is now available in the Azure CLI as well. You can run az bicep lint to lint your bicep files.

In this post we'll look at how to run lint Bicep in Azure Pipelines and GitHub Actions, and surface the output in the UI.

title image reading "Bicep lint with Azure Pipelines and GitHub Actions" with the Bicep logo

Azure Pipelines meet Vitest

· 3 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

This post explains how to integrate the tremendous test runner Vitest with the continuous integration platform Azure Pipelines. If you read the post on integrating with Jest, you'll recognise a lot of common ground with this. Once again we want:

  1. Tests run as part of our pipeline
  2. A failing test fails the build
  3. Test results reported in Azure Pipelines UI

title image reading "Azure Pipelines meet Vitest" with the Pipelines and Vitest logos

Permissioning Azure Pipelines with Bicep and Azure RBAC Role Assignments

· 9 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

How can we deploy resources to Azure, and then run an integration test through them in the context of an Azure Pipeline? This post will show how to do this by permissioning our Azure Pipeline to access these resources using Azure RBAC role assignments. It will also demonstrate a dotnet test that runs in the context of the pipeline and makes use of those role assignments.

title image reading "Permissioning Azure Pipelines with Bicep and Role Assignments" and some Azure logos

Bicep meet Azure Pipelines

· 5 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

Bicep is a terser and more readable alternative language to ARM templates. Running ARM templates in Azure Pipelines is straightforward. However, there isn't yet a first class experience for running Bicep in Azure Pipelines. This post demonstrates an approach that can be used until a Bicep task is available.

Bicep meet Azure Pipelines

Azure Pipelines meet Jest

· 4 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

This post explains how to integrate the tremendous test runner Jest with the continuous integration platform Azure Pipelines. Perhaps we're setting up a new project and we've created a new React app with Create React App. This ships with Jest support out of the box. How do we get that plugged into Pipelines such that:

  1. Tests run as part of our pipeline
  2. A failing test fails the build
  3. Test results reported in Azure Pipelines UI

Related: there is a post on Vitest and Azure Pipelines.