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14 min read
John Reilly

This post shows how to build and deploy a simple web application to Azure Container Apps using Bicep and GitHub Actions. This includes the configuration and deployment of secrets.

This post follows on from the previous post which deployed infrastructure and a "hello world" container, this time introducing the building of an image and storing it in the GitHub container registry so it can be deployed.

If you'd like to learn more about using dapr with Azure Container Apps then you might want to read this post.

title image reading "Azure Container Apps: build and deploy with Bicep and GitHub Actions" with the Bicep, Azure Container Apps and GitHub Actions logos

4 min read
John Reilly

Azure Container Apps are an exciting way to deploy containers to Azure. This post shows how to deploy the infrastructure for an Azure Container App to Azure using Bicep and GitHub Actions. The Azure Container App documentation features quickstarts for deploying your first container app using both the Azure Portal and the Azure CLI. These are great, but there's a gap if you prefer to deploy using Bicep and you'd like to get your CI/CD setup right from the beginning. This post aims to fill that gap.

If you're interested in building your own containers as well, it's worth looking at this follow up post.

title image reading "Azure Container Apps, Bicep and GitHub Actions" with the Bicep, Azure Container Apps and GitHub Actions logos

8 min read
John Reilly

The Open Graph protocol has become the standard mechanism for sharing rich content on the web. This post looks at what implementing Open Graph tags for sharable previews (often called social media previews) looks like, the tools you can use and also examines the different platform rendering issue.

title image reading "Open Graph: a guide to sharable social media previews" with the open graph logo and screenshots of twitter shared cards

6 min read
John Reilly

There's a debate to be had about whether using JavaScript or TypeScript leads to better outcomes when building a project. The introduction of using JSDoc annotations to type a JavaScript codebase introduces a new dynamic to this discussion. This post will investigate what that looks like, and come to an (opinionated) conclusion.

title image reading "JSDoc JavaScript vs TypeScript" with a JavaScript logo and TypeScript logo

6 min read
John Reilly

Azure standard tests are a tremendous way to monitor the uptime of your services in Azure. Sometimes also called availability tests, web tests and ping tests, this post goes through how to deploy one using Bicep. It also looks at some of the gotchas that you may encounter as you're setting it up.

title image reading "Azure standard availability tests with Bicep" with a Bicep logo and Azure logos

11 min read
John Reilly

NSwag is a great tool for generating client libraries in C# and TypeScript from Open API / Swagger definitions. You can face issues where Open API property names collide due to the nature of the C# language, and when you want to use decimal for your floating point numeric type over double. This post demonstrates how to get over both issues.

title image reading "NSwag generated C# client: Open API property name clashes and decimal types rather than double" with a C# logo and Open API logos

3 min read
John Reilly

Google Discover is a way that people can find your content. To make your content more attractive, Google encourage using high quality images which are enabled by setting the max-image-preview:large meta tag. This post shows you how to achieve that with Docusaurus.

title image reading "Docusaurus, meta tags and Google Discover" with a Docusaurus logo and the Google Discover phone photo taken from https://developers.google.com/search/docs/advanced/mobile/google-discover

6 min read
John Reilly

People being able to discover your website when they search is important. This post is about how you can add structured data to a site. Adding structured data will help search engines like Google understand your content, and get it in front of more eyeballs. We'll illustrate this by making a simple React app which incorporates structured data.

title image reading "Structured data, SEO and React" with a screenshot of the rich results tool in the background

9 min read
John Reilly

How can we deploy resources to Azure, and then run an integration test through them in the context of an Azure Pipeline? This post will show how to do this by permissioning our Azure Pipeline to access these resources using Azure RBAC role assignments. It will also demonstrate a dotnet test that runs in the context of the pipeline and makes use of those role assignments.

title image reading "Permissioning Azure Pipelines with Bicep and Role Assignments" and some Azure logos

9 min read
John Reilly

Google has a wealth of APIs which we can interact with. At the time of writing, there's more than two hundred available; including YouTube, Google Calendar and GMail (alongside many others). To integrate with these APIs, it's necessary to authenticate and then use that credential with the API. This post will take you through how to do just that using TypeScript. It will also demonstrate how to use one of those APIs: the Google Calendar API.

5 min read
John Reilly

TypeScript has the ability to define classes as abstract. This means they cannot be instantiated directly, only non-abstract subclasses can be. Let's take a look at what this means when it comes to constructor usage.

7 min read
John Reilly

If we're provisioning resources in Azure with Bicep, we may have a need to acquire the connection strings and keys of our newly deployed infrastructure. For example, the connection strings of an event hub or the access keys of a storage account. Perhaps we'd like to use them to run an end-to-end test, perhaps we'd like to store these secrets somewhere for later consumption. This post shows how to do that using Bicep and the listKeys helper. Optionally it shows how we could consume this in Azure Pipelines.