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14 posts tagged with "C#"

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· 11 min read
John Reilly

NSwag is a great tool for generating client libraries in C# and TypeScript from Open API / Swagger definitions. You can face issues where Open API property names collide due to the nature of the C# language, and when you want to use decimal for your floating point numeric type over double. This post demonstrates how to get over both issues.

title image reading "NSwag generated C# client: Open API property name clashes and decimal types rather than double" with a C# logo and Open API logos

· 5 min read
John Reilly

C# 9 has some amazing features. Azure Functions are have two modes: isolated and in-process. Whilst isolated supports .NET 5 (and hence C# 9), in-process supports .NET Core 3.1 (C# 8). This post shows how we can use C# 9 with in-process Azure Functions running on .NET Core 3.1.

title image showing name of post and the Azure Functions logo

· 6 min read
John Reilly

This post differs from my typical fayre. Most often I write "here's how to do a thing". This is not that. It's more "don't do this thing I did". And maybe also, "how can we avoid a situation like this happening again in future?". On this topic I very much don't have all the answers - but by putting my thoughts down maybe I'll learn and maybe others will educate me. I would love that!

· 9 min read
John Reilly

Updated 03/01/2013

I've written a subsequent post which builds on the work of this original post. The new post exposes this functionality via a WCF service and can be found here.

Making PDFs from HTML

I wanted to talk about an approach I've discovered for making PDFs directly from HTML. I realise that in these wild and crazy days of PDF.js and the like that techniques like this must seem very old hat. That said, this technique works and more importantly it solves a problem I was faced with but without forcing the users to move the "newest hottest version of X". Much as many of would love to solve problems this way, alas many corporations move slower than that and in the meantime we still have to deliver - we still have to meet requirements. Rather than just say "I did this" I thought I'd record how I got to this point in the first place. I don't know about you but I find the reasoning behind why different technical decisions get made quite an interesting topic...

· 6 min read
John Reilly

So it's 2010 and I've started using jQuery. jQuery is a JavaScript library. This means that I'm writing JavaScript... Gulp! I should say that at this point in time I *hated* JavaScript (I have mentioned this previously). But what I know now is that I barely understood the language at all. All the JavaScript I knew was the result of copying and pasting after I'd hit "view source". I don't feel too bad about this - not because my ignorance was laudable but because I certainly wasn't alone in this. It seems that up until recently hardly anyone knew anything about JavaScript. It puzzles me now that I thought this was okay. I suppose like many people I didn't think JavaScript was capable of much and hence felt time spent researching it would be wasted. Just to illustrate where I was then, here is 2009 John's idea of some pretty "advanced" JavaScript: